Our Location & Hours

Our Location & Hours

Optometrist, San Ramon, Optometric Center & Eyewear Galleria

2551 San Ramon Valley Blvd.
Suite #101
San Ramon, CA 94583 View Map

 
Mon, Wed, Thurs: 9:00am - 6:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am - 7:00pm
Friday: 10:00am - 5:00pm

* Exams 9am-5:15pm Mon-Thurs; 10am-4pm Fri

elderly woman sitting in garden edit 2 Aging is inevitable, but eye disease and vision loss don't need to be.  There's plenty you can do to keep your vision sharp and your eyes healthy -- and the sooner you start, the better!  For instance, protect your eyes from the sun's ultraviolet (UV) rays.  Wear one hundred percent UV-blocking sunglasses; wraparounds offer the best protection.  Wear sunglasses every time you step outside during daylight hours -- rain or shine, year-round.  Shield your eyes from blue-light exposure.  If you work on a computer or are on digital devices fro several hours each day, blue-light-blocking computer glasses, filters, and apps are available to help.  If you smoke, quit.  What's awful for your heart and lungs is awful for your eyes.  Smoking spikes the risk of all sorts of eye diseases and conditions.  Stay (or become) active.  For example, regular exercise can help lower high blood pressure, reduce cholesterol, and keep diabetes in check, all of which are beneficial to your eyes.  Studies have shown that sedentary people experience more vision loss as they age than active people.  Eat a healthy, balanced diet.  Include healthy fats (e.g., omega-03 fatty acids) and proteins, plenty of water, and five to nine servingvs daily of fruits and vegetables rich and varied in color.  Reduce the amount of sugar, refined grains (e.g., white bread, pasta, etc.), unhealthy fats, and processed foods from your diet.  Last but certainly not least, schedule regular eye exams to detect vison-threatening conditions before they cause any damage.  For some diseases, the first symptom is permanent vision impairment.

girl reading book editFor parents, the back-to-school ritual frequently involves purchasing new clothes, shoes, and school supplies for their kids.  A crucial element often overlooked is a comprehensive eye exam.  Specialists say that eighty percent of learning is visual.  And it's not just a matter of clear distance vision and near vision.  Proper eye movement; how the eyes work together; and shifting focus from near to far, and vice versa, are critical elements as well.  If a child has an undetected vision problem, they're at a significant disadvantage academically, socially, and athletically -- frustration mounts and performance suffers.  Some vision conditions elicit symptoms that are mistakenly attributed to attention deficit hyperactivity disorder.  Kids often don't complain about vision problems ... they don't realize their vision is abnormal.  They might exhibit warning signs such as squinting, tilting their head to view something, constantly rubbing their eyes, and avoiding tasks such as reading, to name a few.  For athletes, school sports practices typically begin a few weeks before the academic year.  Good vision is crucial to achieving peak performance and styaing safe on the field of play.  Protective eyewear (with an up-to-date prescription) is key to fending off errant balls, sticks, elbows, and fingers.  If you have a school-age child, make a back-to-school eye exam at our office part of your summer to-do list today.

 

swimming edit2Taking proper care of your contact lenses is critical to staying free of eye infections. As part of a proper maintenance regimen, avoid exposing your contacts to water. That includes tap water, well water, showers, hot tubs, and any water you might swim in.
Contacts are like sponges, soaking up any chemicals or bacteria contained in the water they are exposed to. They can also trap bacteria between the lens and the surface of the eye.

One type of bacteria found in water (even chlorinated water) that can be a menace to eyes is Acanthamoeba. Acanthamoeba can cause painful corneal infection called Acanthamoeba keratitis. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, over 85 percent of cases involve contact lens wearers. Besides pain, symptoms include redness, blurred vision, light sensitivity, a burning/itching sensation, and excessive tearing. Acanthamoeba keratitis is sight threatening and may necessitate a corneal transplant if not diagnosed and treated promptly.

Never clean your contact lenses with tap water or homemade solutions, and never wear contacts while showering or swimming. If you absolutely need the vision correction that contacts provide while swimming, also wear a pair of airtight swimming goggles to create a barrier.

Changes in your eyes or vision warrant a call to our office. Don't take chances with your sight.

sunglasses on beachThere are plenty of misconceptions about sunglasses. We'd like to clear a few of them up.

MYTH #1: All sunglasses provide ultraviolet (UV) ray protection.

Truth is, some sunglasses are deficient or provide no UV protection at all. Make sure lenses are rated UV400 or higher, which block out 99.9 percent of UV light (UVA and UVB).

 

MYTH #2: The darker the lens, the more UV protection you have.

UV protection is determined by either a lens treatment or the type of plastic polymer of the lens. The degree of lens tint has no bearing on UV protection.

 

MYTH #3: As long as your lenses provide 100-percent UV protection, you're set.

Some sunglasses allow too much UV light to enter the eyes from the side, top, and/or bottom of the lenses. Wraparound sunglasses are a good solution.

 

MYTH #4: Sunglasses can “expire.”

Currently, there is no evidence that UV protection diminishes over time. An accumulation of scratches, however, can distort vision and cause eye strain.

 

MYTH #5: You don't need sunglasses on cloudy days or over the winter.

UV light can be just as intense (or more so) during these times. Wear your sunglasses anytime you're outdoors during daylight hours.

If you need a new pair of sunglasses, come check out the efficient and stylish selections we carry at our office.

eye closeup edit

A pinguecula is a yellowish bump that forms on the white of the eye (sclera), near the edge of the cornea. More often than not, it arises on the side nearest the nose.

Overexposure to ultraviolet (UV) rays is the primary cause of a pinguecula. Frequent exposure to dusty, windy, or extremely dry conditions can contribute as well. Those who are middle-aged or older are at highest risk.

A pinguecula is not cancerous, but any growth on the eye should prompt an optometric checkup. In many cases, a pinguecula is not bothersome; however, for some people it can be a nuisance and more:

  • If a pinguecula is big enough, it may cause difficulty in wearing contact lenses.
  • Since a pinguecula is a raised bump, the tear film may not spread evenly, leading to dry eyes (stinging, itching, foreign-body sensation, etc.).
  • A pinguecula may become swollen or inflamed (pingueculitis).
  • “Attractive” is not a word generally associated with a pinguecula.

Treatment varies depending upon symptoms and severity. Various eyedrops (prescription and/or nonprescription), nonsteroidal antiinflammatory medication, and scleral contacts may be beneficial. Some people want a pinguecula surgically removed due to functional or cosmetic reasons. Wearing UV-protective sunglasses whenever outdoors in daylight hours is an important piece of the puzzle, too.

Our Location & Hours

Optometrist, San Ramon, Optometric Center & Eyewear Galleria

2551 San Ramon Valley Blvd.
Suite #101
San Ramon, CA 94583 View Map

 
Mon, Wed, Thurs: 9:00am - 6:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am - 7:00pm
Friday: 10:00am - 5:00pm

* Exams 9am-5:15pm Mon-Thurs; 10am-4pm Fri