Our Location & Hours

Our Location & Hours

Optometrist, San Ramon, Optometric Center & Eyewear Galleria

2551 San Ramon Valley Blvd.
Suite #101
San Ramon, CA 94583 View Map

 
Mon, Wed, Thurs: 9:00am - 6:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am - 7:00pm
Friday: 10:00am - 5:00pm

* Exams 9am-5:15pm Mon-Thurs; 10am-4pm Fri

Eye Care Tips

 

by Michael Duong, OD, FAAO

It is holiday season again! Many of us will be heading to the mountains, traveling to see relatives  or taking a nice vacation to a warm place.  Here are some tips that you can take with you while traveling.

 

Bring a pair of back-up glasses - If you wear glasses, bring two pairs of glasses on every trip.  You never know when you may break or lose a pair of glasses.  If you wear contact lenses, bring extra pairs of contacts just in case you rip or tear a contact lens along with your back-up glasses.

 

Prepare for dry eyes - Traveling on a plane for few hours? The dry air in the cabin can cause dryness and irritation especially if you wear contact lenses.  If you plan on sleeping, it is best to take out your contact lenses and wear your glasses while on the plane.  Bring over-the-counter artificial tears to lubricate your eyes.  

 

Bring contact lens solution - Always bring two travel size contact lens solutions with you in case one spills.  Remember to place your contact lenses in the proper contact lens case and bring a back up case.  Never clean your contact lenses with tap water, as bacteria and other micro-organisms can cause serious eye infections.  

 

Bring sunglasses - Make sure you have a set of shades that block 99% UV.  Protecting your eyes from the sun does not only apply to the beach; UV rays reflected from the snow can cause your eyes to burn and cause damage.  Whether you are on the beach, going to the mountains, or taking a road trip to Disneyland; wearing a good pair of sunglasses is very important for protecting your eyes.  

 

Stock up on prescription drops - If you take prescription eye drops, bring extra unopened bottles on your trip especially when traveling overseas.  Medications that you are taking may not be available at your destination.  If you need eye drops for allergies, glaucoma, or dry eyes, be sure to bring them with you and bring extras.  

 

Bring a copy of your current prescription for contact lenses and/or glasses - If you lose your contact lenses or glasses you can use your prescription to get replacements in a timely manner.  You don’t want to ruin your trip because you can’t see!

 

Don’t ignore changes to your vision - Don’t ignore sudden blurred vision, eye pain, red eye, or double vision.  These conditions may not be painful but can be the result of serious eye and health problems.  Don’t wait. It is best to seek medical attention immediately from a local eye doctor to prevent vision loss.  We have a 24 hour emergency phone service for our patients that will allow direct access to our doctor for a phone consultation.  925-743-1222

 Winter Dry Eyes VSP 1 700x368

 

by Michael Duong, OD, FAAO

Winter weather means colder temperatures, winds, and lack of moisture which can wreak havoc on your eyes. Cold outdoor air and heated indoor air can cause your eyes to dry out.  Here are tips to take care of your eye during winter.

 

  1. Drink enough water. Mild dehydration can cause your eyes to dry out.  Consume fluid-rich foods such as soup, fruits and veggies.

 

  1. Lubricate your eyes with artificial tears.  The tears on your eyes evaporate much more quickly during the winter months.  Artificial tears can help keep your tears on the eyes longer.  Not all artificial tears are made equal.  See your eye doctor to find out which eye drops are the best for you.  

 

  1. Incorporate Omega-3s into your diet. Dry eyes is caused by inflammation of the tear glands.  Omega-3s helps reduce inflammation and increase tear production to lubricate the eyes.  Foods such as salmon, cod, and herring are rich in Omega-3s.  Taking a Omega-3 supplement can also help your eyes as well as your heart.  Ask your doctor which dry eye supplement is right for you.  

 

  1. Use a humidifier. During the winter season, the humidity in your home can drop to 35-55 percent leading to dry eyes.  One of the best ways to increase humidity is to purchase a humidifier.  

 

  1. Wear sunglasses. Heading to the mountains? Snow and ice create reflective surfaces that can harm your eyes with ultraviolet light (UV).  Without sunglasses, you will experience glare, eyestrain, frequent blinking, and other discomfort.  Always wear sunglasses or goggles while outdoors to protect your eyes from the sun.  Your eyes can get sunburned, a condition known as photokeratitis.  Fortunately, it is temporary but can be painful.  Protect your eyes from UV light.  

 

Winter can be irritating to the eyes, if you are experiencing and problems, we are just a phone call away. 925-743-1222.

 two pigs fsa

by Michael Duong, OD FAAO

It is Holiday season again, time for family gathering and making purchases for loved ones.  You have worked hard all year, why not take care of yourself?  Let’s take a look at the most common pre-tax dollar accounts that you can use for your eyes.  

  1. Flex Spending Account (FSA) - As name name states, these accounts are the most “flexible” of the pre-tax dollar accounts.  Money in this account may be used towards co-pays, deductibles, eyeglasses, contact lenses, LASIK surgery, eye health supplements and other medical equipment.  This account has a use it or lose it proposition.  The money does not roll over from one year to the next and money that is left over will not be returned to the employee.  For 2017 FSA contribution limit is $2,600.
  2. Health Savings Account (HSA) -  Many of the things that are covered in an FSA account are covered in the HSA account.  However, items such as eye vitamins will need a prescription from your doctor. HSA can be rolled over to the following year and employees are only eligible if they have a high deductible health plan.  For 2017 HSA contribution limits are $3,400 for self-only coverage and $6,750 for family coverage.  If you are 55 years of age and older, you can contribute an additional $1,000 to your plan.  
  3. Health Reimbursement Account (HRA) / Medical Reimbursement Account (MRA) - typically through your medical insurance and will automatically pay for any overages that may otherwise be your responsibility such as deductibles or co-insurance amounts.  Talk to your employer or HR department for more details.

 

Both HSA and FSA do not get taxed when you withdraw for medical expenses.  The amounts can be deducted from your income to lower your taxes.  

Our office also accepts CareCredit, which is a unique health care spending card.  Up to 90% who apply are approved and it can be done in the office.  CareCredit can be used for co-pays, deductibles, LASIK, contact lenses, eyeglasses, eye vitamins and more. With CareCredit, we offer six to twelve month repayment plans with no interest.  

Call our office today to find out how you can use your HSA/FSA or CareCredit accounts toward your vision today!  925-743-1222.

by Michael Duong, OD FAAO

 A 40 year-old patient came to our office complaining of blurred vision in her left eye more than her right eye.  She had worn glasses in the past and her contact lenses were never clear out of her left eye.  She stated that her astigmatism was worse in her left eye than her right. Below are her test results using the Visionix VX-120 screening technology that is tested on every patient at our clinic.

 

Pellucid

Astigmatism occurs when the light that enters the eye is out of focus, causing blurred vision whether looking far away or up close.  It is a very common condition and seen daily at our office.  The cause of astigmatism is usually due to the front part of the eye called the cornea being more curved in one meridian than the other meridian.  Think of the eye as a clock that goes from 12 - 6 in one meridian and 3 - 9 in the other meridian.  One meridian is more curved than the other meridian resulting in astigmatism.  This results in the eye being more shaped like a “football” rather than a baseball, this is called regular astigmatism.  

 

Our patient has a condition called pellucid marginal degeneration which causes the bottom part of the front surface of the eye (cornea) to be thinner than the rest of the cornea resulting in irregular astigmatism. It is a slowly progressive disease that gets worse over many years.  This is the reason why her traditional astigmatism contact lenses never fit her well and were always uncomfortable. In the past, she was never screened for this condition and was glad she finally knew why her left eye was more blurry than her right eye.  Fortunately, there are options to correct her vision, one of the best options is a specialized contact lens called a scleral lens.  A scleral lens differs from a normal contact lens in that it can correct irregular astigmatism.  She was thrilled with this option and will return to our office for a custom contact lens fitting to improve her vision.

 

Call our office today 925-743-1222 to schedule an eye appointment to be screened by this innovative technology.

school children png 21

 

By Michael Duong, OD FAAO

Myopia or nearsightedness occurs when light enters the eye and is focused in front of the retina, causing distance objects to be blurred. This disease has increased 40 percent in the last 30 years in the United States.  Eye doctors are diagnosing myopia at a younger age than in the past and an area of concern is high myopia (greater than -5.00 D). High myopia can lead to conditions such as cataracts, glaucoma, and retinal detachment.  

Risk factors for developing myopia

  • Family history
  • Time spent outdoors
  • Time spent on near work
  • Age of onset
  • Ethnicity

If one parent is nearsighted, a child is 40 percent likely to be nearsighted.  If both parents are nearsighted, the child is 70 percent likely to be nearsighted.  In addition, children that spend time more indoors are more likely to have progression in their myopia than children that spend more time outdoors.  The American Optometric Association recommends 12-14 hours of outdoor activity a week. Due to the increase use of digital devices, children are becoming more myopic as well.  It is recommended that young children spend no more than 1-2 hours on digital devices. I understand it is very difficult in this day in age to do that.  Parents must be proactive and understand that myopia is a disease that can cause impaired vision as it progresses.  

Traditionally, glasses have been prescribed to correct myopia.  More recently, numerous studies have been conducted on methods to reduce myopia progression.  One of the most effective methods is called Orthokeratology or Ortho-K. Ortho-K is a process of wearing rigid gas permeable contact lenses at night to reshape the front surface of the eye called the cornea.  The lenses are removed during the day and the child can see all day without wearing glasses or contact lenses. Think of this treatment as braces for your eyes instead of your teeth.  Studies show on average Ortho-K can reduce myopia progression by as much as 50 percent.  Ortho-K provides a distinct advantage over other types of vision correction including freedom from wearing daytime glasses and contact lenses and slowing the rate of myopia. View the video below to see how Ortho-K works.

 

Call our office today 925-743-1222 to schedule a consultation to see if your child is a candidate for Ortho-K.

Our Location & Hours

Optometrist, San Ramon, Optometric Center & Eyewear Galleria

2551 San Ramon Valley Blvd.
Suite #101
San Ramon, CA 94583 View Map

 
Mon, Wed, Thurs: 9:00am - 6:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am - 7:00pm
Friday: 10:00am - 5:00pm

* Exams 9am-5:15pm Mon-Thurs; 10am-4pm Fri