Our Location & Hours

Our Location & Hours

Optometrist, San Ramon, Optometric Center & Eyewear Galleria

2551 San Ramon Valley Blvd.
Suite #101
San Ramon, CA 94583 View Map

 
Mon, Wed, Thurs: 9:00am - 6:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am - 7:00pm
Friday: 10:00am - 5:00pm

* Exams 9am-5:15pm Mon-Thurs; 10am-4pm Fri

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6/16/17

by Michael Duong, O.D., F.A.A.O

Glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration, and cataracts can be genetically linked.  If someone in your family has glaucoma, you are four to nine times more likely to have glaucoma.  Glaucoma is a disease that causes damage to your peripheral vision and eventually can affect your central vision if left untreated.  A great place to ask about these conditions is at a family reunion.  Also, be sure to tell family members if you have an eye disease. 

If you are in your 60 and older, you are at risk of cataracts and age-related macular degeneration.  Cataracts and macular degeneration causes central vision to be cloudy gradually.  Both conditions cause painless loss of vision so it is difficult to tell the difference between the two.  However, macular degeneration causes irreversible damage to the retina and can severely distort and impair vision if left untreated.  Smoking causes an increase risk of cataracts and macular degeneration so it is important to stop smoking as soon as possible. 

Research also shows that refractive conditions such as nearsightedness, farsightedness, and astigmatism can also be genetic.  Therefore, it is important to have children examined as early as 6-months of age to correct for these conditions.  Vision and learning is important to development and it is directly related to success in the classroom.

Schedule your eye examination today at the Optometric Center and Eyewear Galleria.  Please call 925-743-1222. 

 YAY - Summer is Officially here!

pool

 6/1/17

School is out and we finally get to spend some serious time in the pool. But before you jump in, here are a few quick safety tips for you and your eyes:

 

  • The pH of our eyes is 7.2, so can you guess what the recommended pH is for your pool? (hint: it’s 7.2!) Remember to check the pH levels in your pool at least once or twice a week and try to keep it in the range of 7.0-7.6.

  • Chemical conjunctivitis or red eyes can occur due to chlorine exposure in swimming pools. Having a little after a day in the pool is okay, but if it persists into the next day or if it seems to be getting worse, call your optometrist and ask to have your eyes checked that same day.

  • As a general rule, contact lenses should never be worn in the pool. Doing so puts you at risk for a variety of possible infections, including a fungal infection called Fusariumkeratitis that is difficult to treat and can lead to permanent blindness. (The only exclusion to this rule is for my daily disposable contact lens patients under the strict condition that their contacts are thrown out as soon as they leave the pool.)

  • Prescription goggles are available and can be fairly inexpensive! If you rely on your glasses to see, talk to your optometrist about prescription goggles for use in the pool.

  • And if you plan to be hanging out around the pool this summer, remember that sunglasses are just as important for protecting your eyes as sunblock is for protecting your skin. Make sure yours have UVA and UVB protection.

 

Have safe and fun summer!

 

Visian ICL

5/19/17

By Michael Duong, O.D., F.A.A.O

Have you been told that you are not a candidate for LASIK because your prescription is too high or your cornea is too thin?  Another option exists to address this issue called implantable lenses.  Implantable lenses are surgically placed behind the the colored part of the eye (Iris) and in front of the natural lens inside of the eye.  The implantable lenses work like contact lenses, but are placed inside the eye instead of on top of the front surface of the eye (cornea).  

The Visian ICL (Implantable Collamer Lens) was approved in 2005 for correcting nearsightedness from -3D to -20D.  The lens is implanted behind the iris and in front of the natural lens.  This makes the lens undetectable to the naked eye unless viewing under a microscope.  The lens is flexible and can be folded prior to insertion which leads to a small surgical incision.  

Recently, I had the pleasure of co-managing our patient Lisa for Visian ICL surgery, she had dry eyes with her contacts and her prescription was -12 D in the right eye and -10D in the left eye.  Now, she can see 20/20 in each eye without glasses or contact lenses.  

If you suffer from dry eyes, irregular astigmatism, or have been told that you are not a candidate for LASIK, ask about Visian ICL surgery.  The video below describes the Visian ICL procedure.  Call our office for more information.    

View Video

 AmbioDisk Bright

 5/12/17

By Michael Duong, O.D., F.A.A.O

Dry eye is a disease that causes irritation, redness, burning, and stinging.  There are many treatment options for dry eye including over-the-counter and prescription eye drops. A new treatment called AmbioDisk, about the size of a small contact lens contains amniotic membrane which has regenerative properties that can help bring the eye to a normal state.  The disk is placed on the front surface of the eye called the cornea.  Clinical studies have shown that AmbioDisk can heal the eye, soothe pain, and improve vision.  The disk can be inserted and removed in office.  

The disk is carefully placed on the cornea, then a soft contact lens is placed over the disk to keep it in place. Over a 5-7 day period, the nutrients from the disk dissolve into the cornea to help heal the eye.  The purpose of AmbioDisk iis to bring the eye back to a normal state where eye drops and conventional treatments can become more effective in the treatment of dry eyes.  

AmbioDisk can be used for the following conditions on the cornea:

  • Non-Healing Epithelial Corneal Defects
  • Corneal Erosions
  • Acute Chemical / Thermal Burns
  • Eye Infections
  • Dry Eyes


If you have any questions about the AmbioDisk treatment, please do not hesitate to contact our office for more details.  

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5/5/17

By Michael Duong, O.D., F.A.A.O

According to the American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology, 50 million people have eye allergies affecting 30% of adults and 40% of children.  When allergens affect the eyes it causes red, itchy, and watery eyes.  The most common allergens that cause eye allergies are pollen, mold, dust, and pet dander.  

 What can you do to survive allergy season?

1.  Try to avoid or limit your exposure to allergens.  If you are outdoors, wear wraparound sunglasses and drive with the windows up.  If the pollen count is high, try to stay indoors with the air conditioner running.  

2.  Use artificial tears or over-the-counter antihistamine eye drops to help reduce itchy and swelling of the eyes.   Ask your eye doctor which type of treatment is best for you.  

3.  Try not to rub your eyes because this causes more itching!  Rubbing your eyes causes histamine to be released and causes runny nose and itchy eyes.   

4.  If you are a contact lens wearer, consider switching to daily disposable contact lens wear.  Allergens adhere to the lenses which are disposed at the end of the day with daily disposable contact lenses.  

5.   Make sure you wash your face and take a shower before bedtime to remove dirt and allergens from your eyes and face.

 If over-the-counter medications do not reduce eye allergies, prescription strength eye drops can be prescribed in severe cases.  See your eye doctor to determine which medicated treatment is most effective in treating your eye allergies.  

Our Location & Hours

Optometrist, San Ramon, Optometric Center & Eyewear Galleria

2551 San Ramon Valley Blvd.
Suite #101
San Ramon, CA 94583 View Map

 
Mon, Wed, Thurs: 9:00am - 6:00pm
Tuesday: 9:00am - 7:00pm
Friday: 10:00am - 5:00pm

* Exams 9am-5:15pm Mon-Thurs; 10am-4pm Fri